RUTH BADER GINSBURG: Feminist Icon of the Supreme Court Dead at 87


Ruth Bader Ginsburg, the second woman appointed to the Supreme Court and an icon for the rights of women, died Friday at her Washington, D.C. home from complications of pancreatic cancer. She was 87.

Ruth Bader Ginsburg, the second woman appointed to the Supreme Court and an icon for the rights of women, died Friday at her Washington, D.C. home from complications of pancreatic cancer. She was 87.

TeeRoy's 2 Cents:

  • Her death set off a huge political controversy over whether Donald Trump should nominate a new justice and the Senate should vote on his nomination prior to the presidential election.
  • Rest in power Notorious R.B.G.
  • No matter which side of the political spectrum you're on, you've got to give respect for an incredible woman, who had an incredible career.

Ruth Bader Ginsburg, the second woman appointed to the Supreme Court and an icon for the rights of women, died Friday at her Washington, D.C. home from complications of pancreatic cancer. She was 87.

For a period of time, she served as the only female justice on the Supreme Court, which in a 2014 interview, she called "the worst times." She added, "The image to the public entering the courtroom was eight men, of a certain size, and then this little woman sitting to the side. That was not a good image for the public to see." She was eventually joined by two other justices,Sonya Sotomayor and Elena Kagan, both named by President Obama.

Ginsburg was nominated to the Supreme Court in 1993 by then-President Bill Clinton. She went on to eventually become a cultural icon, nicknamed The Notorious R.B.G., a play on the name of late rapperThe Notorious B.I.G.

She was also considered the leader of the court's liberal side, following the retirement of Justice John Paul Stevens in 2010.

Ginsburg had previously overcome colon cancer in 1999 and began her fight against pancreatic cancer in 2009. Two small tumors were found in her lungs in late 2018 and she had a stent put in to clear a blocked artery in 2014.

Despite her health challenges, she ignored calls for her to retire, hoping to hold out until a Democratic president was in power to nominate her replacement. She vowed to stay on the bench "as long as I can do the job full steam," adding, "There will be a president after this one, and I'm hopeful that that president will be a fine president." (The New York Times)

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